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This Easy Action Really Does Score Epic Impact

Behold, Big-time Inspiration

This rousing 30-second spot shows us how one simple change really can have mind-blowing impact. So go ahead, ditch the flimsy paper cup for an actual mug, and you’ll save absurd amounts of Earth’s valuable resources. (For specific absurdities, check out the video.)

Huge thanks to our friends at Comcast Spotlight Chicago Creative for producing this appropriately epic PSA, which is airing now on 64 stations across Chicagoland. And now…

Snag your earth-saving mug HERE!

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Myth: Hold Your Nose — Composting Stinks!

“Hold Your Nose!”—Said No Real-Life Composter We Talked To, Ever

Every nose has its own unique point of view, er, smell—but all are likely to turn themselves up at the smell of rotting trash. Why then would we assault our nasal passages by composting, aka, piling up a bunch of food and plant waste with the express goal of, gasp, purposefully letting it rot?

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5 Ways to Ditch Paper

Paper Pile-ups, Begone!

 by Lauren Topor, multimedia journalist and Arizona State University grad

There’s nothing quite like tax time to remind you that paper has a knack for piling up. That’s especially true when you consider that the average American receives 41 pounds of junk mail each year, nearly half of which ends up unopened in a landfill, according to 41pounds.org. Plus, even though total paper consumption in the U.S. has declined in recent years, Forest Ethics reports that North American paper consumption still remains a major driver of worldwide deforestation. (Aka, boo.)

The good news is, technology has made it easier than ever for you to reduce paper waste. Here are five great ways to go paperless now:

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Environmental Consequences Aren’t Just Externalities

This is part one of a two-part series by Laurence Hayward, EcoMyths board member and founder/partner of Independence Equity & VentureLab

I hate to think about how long it has been since I was a hopeful freshman anxious to fill my brain with everything I could cram in there.

I had developed an interest in environmental preservation in high school when our debate team took on the issue of water quality. In debate competitions you have to argue both sides of an issue, called the affirmative and the negative. I didn’t enjoy being on the negative side of the environment. I found myself feverishly researching environmental problems and technologies that could solve them, partly to win the debate, but it was more than that. Something took over, I was compelled.